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Since our previous post on this subject of and Alzheimer’s Disease, on 12/24/2012, additional valuable information has become available. Click the Link below for an update.

To learn more about Alzheimer’s or see additional videos, visit http://itsh.bo/fJrKLc.

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The ninth annual Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund Walk to Cure Diabetes will be Saturday, May 9, at Fond du Lac High School. The event is expected to draw around 500 walkers to go the 3-mile distance to raise money for critical Type 1 diabetes (T1D) research.

The Fond du Lac Family YMCA is now forming classes for the next sessions of the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program, an innovative program proven to reduce the burden of Type 2 diabetes, which is one of the nation’s costliest chronic diseases.

T1D is an autoimmune disease that impacts millions of people around the world. T1D is unrelated to diet or lifestyle and occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. T1D requires constant carbohydrate counting, blood-glucose testing, and lifelong dependence on injected insulin. There is no cure.

The YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program is a group-based lifestyle intervention for adults at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. An evening class session will run from 6 to 7 p.m., Tuesdays, and morning classes will be offered from 9 to 10 a.m., Thursdays.

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Two simple steps can lower your risk for Type 2 diabetes. Photo contributed by Kettering Health Network.

Do you often feel very thirsty or very hungry even though you are drinking and eating on a regular basis? Do you suffer from extreme fatigue or blurred vision?

If you answered yes to some of the above questions – you may be among an estimated 86 million adults ages 20 and older in the United States suffering from prediabetes or diabetes according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

“Without lifestyle changes to improve health, 15 to 30 percent of people with pre-diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years,” according to Ann Marcum, RN, BSN and Certified Diabetes Educator with the Joslin Diabetes Center at Kettering Health Network. So, what lifestyle changes will make the most difference? Making these 2 healthy commitments:

Weight loss is also significant to preventing diabetes. Depending on a person’s weight, it is recommended to lose approximately five to seven percent of their body weight (approx. 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person).

Some people may have no symptoms of diabetes at all. Those that are at risk for prediabetes include people that are overweight, smokers, those with a family history of diabetes or a personal history of gestational diabetes, people diagnosed with high blood pressure or blood lipid levels. Physical inactivity, age and ethnicity may also be risk factors. People already suffering from prediabetes are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease or stroke.

“Without lifestyle changes to improve health, 15 to 30 percent of people with pre-diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years,” according to Ann Marcum, RN, BSN and Certified Diabetes Educator with the Joslin Diabetes Center at Kettering Health Network. So, what lifestyle changes will make the most difference? Making these 2 healthy commitments:

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Are You Worried About Diabetes Risk and Statins?

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New Study Shows Type 2 Diabetes Risk Drastically Increased By Statins

Screen Shot 2015-05-11 at 9.05.44 PMA new study has demonstrated a drastic increase in the risk of type 2 diabetes — to the tune of 46 percent — in those taking statins to control high cholesterol levels, according to an article on Diabetes In Control.

The results after accounting for all possible factors were that the 46 percent increased risk of type 2 diabetes held up — statin treatments were almost certainly the culprit.

“Statin therapy was associated with a 46% increased risk of type 2 diabetes after adjustment for confounding factors, suggesting a higher risk of diabetes in the general population than previously reported.

Read More: http://www.inquisitr.com/2045166/new-study-shows-type-2-diabetes-risk-drastically-increased-by-statins/


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Are You at Risk For Type 2 ?

Today marks the annual American Diabetes Association Alert Day®, a “wake-up call” asking the American public to take the Diabetes Risk Test to find out if they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. During its 75th anniversary, the Association continues its focus on ensuring that the public is aware of their risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The campaign will run through April 21.Beginning today, Americans will be urged to take the risk test at diabetes.org/alert and start living a healthy and active lifestyle. One way to do this is by joining or starting a team for one of the Association’s nationwide Step Out: ®Walk to Stop Diabetes® events, which happen primarily in October.     The Diabetes Risk Test requires users to answer simple questions about weight, age, family history and other potential risk factors for diabetes. Their results are reported as a numerical score indicating low or high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Those at higher risk are encouraged to speak with their health care provider to learn more about ways to help reduce their risk or delay onset of the disease.“Awareness is crucial in the effort to Stop Diabetes,” said David Marrero, PhD, President, Health Care & Education, American Diabetes Association. “We’re asking the public to Take It. Share It. Step Out. Take one minute to take the risk test today, share it with your loved ones and get started getting active by getting involved in your local Step Out event.  The Diabetes Risk Test can be the first step in knowing your risk and helping us get closer to our vision of a life free of diabetes and all of its burdens.”The latest diabetes statistics show that one in three American adults are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes.  Another 86 million American adults have prediabetes, which means that their blood glucose (sugar) is higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. What’s more, out of the nearly 30 million Americans with diabetes, one quarter of them, or about eight million, do not realize they have the disease. Recent estimates project that as many as one in three American adults will have diabetes in 2050 unless we take steps to Stop Diabetes®.You can be part of the movement to Stop Diabetes and get your free Diabetes Risk Test (English or Spanish), as well as information about diabetes and joining or starting a team for a Step Out event by visiting at  diabetes.org/alert or by calling 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383). Walgreens is supporting the American Diabetes Association Alert Day efforts and you can ask your local Walgreens pharmacist for a copy of the Diabetes Risk Test.  Although the campaign starts on March 24 and continues through April 21, the Diabetes Risk Test is available year-round.Diabetes Awareness and PreventionThe primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes are being , sedentary, over the age of 45 and having a family history of diabetes. African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are at an increased risk, as are women who have had gestational diabetes or had babies weighing more than nine pounds at birth.Diabetes symptoms can include frequent urination, blurred vision and excessive thirst. However, these overt warning signs may not become manifest for many years. As a result, for many, diagnosis may come 7 to 10 years after the actual onset of the disease. Closing the diagnosis gap is critical to successful treatment and delaying or preventing some of its complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney disease, stroke, amputation and death.Studies have shown that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by losing just 7 percent of body weight (such as 15 pounds if you weigh 200) through regular physical activity (30 minutes a day, five days a week) and healthy eating.Alert Day in Your CommunitySeven leading health organizations are collaborating this Alert Day to prevent type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, the American Medical Association, the Diabetes Prevention and Control Alliance, the National Association of County and City Health Officials, National Council of La Raza, National Council on Aging and the YMCA of the USA are creating awareness about the risk of type 2 diabetes. Today, the organizations will direct people to diabetes.org/million so the public can learn their risk for type 2 diabetes.  The organizations also are working together to determine the impact of delivering the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program at no cost to adults 65 and older in 17 communities.The American Diabetes Association’s local offices are focused on enlisting the help of community organizations to promote Alert Day. To find out what activities are happening locally, visit www.diabetes.org.About the American Diabetes AssociationThe American Diabetes Association is leading the fight to Stop Diabetes and its deadly consequences and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. For the past 75 years, our mission has been to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. For more information please call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit www.diabetes.org. Information from both these sources is available in English and Spanish. 

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Click the Arrow Button if you want to know about being “FED UP”

Get Your FREE Guide to Resources for Diabetes HERE!

Combine the new Fresh Foam 1080 with the adaptive fit technology and comfort of Trinamic Compression Apparel. Shop these collections with superior comfort and performance today exclusively from New Balance!

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How common is Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)?

  • CHD causes round 74,000 deaths each year. That’s an average of 200 people every day
  • In the UK, there are an estimated 2.3 million people living with the condition
  • About one in six men and one in nine women die from the disease
  • Death rates are highest in Scotland and northern England
  • In the past couple of decades, deaths from CHD have nearly halved due to better treatments

Source: British Heart Foundation

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Insulin for Alzheimer’s?

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Insulin is the “KEY TO UNLOCK THE DOOR” allowing glucose, the most important nutrient of the body to do its vital task to fuel the metabolic functions of life. It is the catalytic hormone produced by the Islet Cells of Langerhans in the pancreas. Diabetes Mellitus results from Insulin’s failure to accomplish its task either  because of  Insulin Deficiency (Type I) or Insulin Resistance of the cells (Type II). However, Type II Diabetes is only one form of insulin resistance. In addition to the hyperglycemia of Type 2 diabetes, several other unhealthy conditions associated with insulin resistance include obesity, hyperlipidemia and hypertension (now collectively lumped together as members of the Metabolic Syndrome). A new member of the syndrome recognized recently  is Alzheimers Dementia. The video below outlines how this new knowledge is being used as an important component of our efforts to treat this devastating disease. Stay tuned for the update!

Share your thoughts in the Comments below, please!


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Posted on February 07, 2012 by The VRG Blog Editor

Gestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. It can cause problems during pregnancy and in the newborn infant. Risk factors for gestational diabetes include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and ethnicity. Hispanics, African Americans, Native Americans, Pacific Islanders, Asians, and Asian Indians are at higher risk for developing this condition.

A just-published study examined dietary factors that could increase a woman’s risk of developing gestational diabetes. Women who ate the highest amount of animal fat before they were pregnant had about a 90% greater risk of developing gestational diabetes compared with women eating the lowest amount of animal fat. There was no association between vegetable fat and gestational diabetes. Cholesterol was also associated with an increased risk. The study authors suggest that even as simple a change as replacing 5% of animal fat with vegetable fat could reduce risk of diabetes. While women cannot change risk factors like ethnicity or family history of diabetes, moving away from (or eliminating) animal fat could markedly change their risk of gestational diabetes. “Our findings indicate that women who reduce the proportion of animal fat and cholesterol in their diets before pregnancy may lower their risk for gestational diabetes during pregnancy,” said senior author Cuilin Zhang, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., of the Epidemiology Branch at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

To read more about this study see: http://www.nih.gov/news/health/jan2012/nichd-25.htm

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New School Lunch Nutrition Standards

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by Daniel J. DeNoon

January 25, 2012 — For the first time in 15 years, the National School Lunch Program has raised nutrition standards.

The new rules mean kids will see more fruits and vegetables every day. Portions will be smaller. Only low-fat or skim milk will be served. There will be a lot more whole grains. And schools will get more money — an extra six cents a meal — from the federal government.

But Congress in 2011 forbade the USDA from limiting servings of potatoes. The law also allows schools to count the tomato paste on pizza as a vegetable. But Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says that won’t throw a monkey wrench into the new standards.

“It was a bit unfortunate that some groups had powerful friends in Congress and basically tried to sort of short-change [kids] and create some confusion with these standards,” Vilsack said at a news conference. “Our response was to set up minimum requirements. You have to have a minimum level of dark green vegetables, you’ve got to have a minimum level of red or orange or yellow vegetables.”

Celebrity chef Rachael Ray, who joined Vilsack in announcing the new standards, says the potato/pizza loopholes won’t keep the new rules from making school lunches healthier.

“OK, so congress left pizza a vegetable. But we are changing the game today,” Ray said. “That [lunch] tray is going to have leafy greens and colorful fruit on it. If one of the other vegetables happens to be pizza or French fries in some schools that day, it doesn’t negate the fact that on the tray there is going to be a goal, depending on grade level, of roughly 800 calories — and it will include vegetables and fruits.”

Vilsack said that schools will be encouraged to serve baked or roasted potatoes instead of French fries.

About 32 million U.S. kids eat school lunches. Many of these kids get half their daily calories from these meals.

New School Lunch Rules

Today’s rules mean that school lunches must:

  • Offer a minimum of 8 to 10 ounces of whole grains. No more than two desserts a week may be used to meet this minimum
  • Offer at least a half cup per week of dark green vegetables
  • Offer at least 3/4 cup red/orange vegetables for grades K-8, and at least 1 1/4 cups in grades 9-12
  • Offer at least a half cup of beans or peas
  • Offer at least a half cup of starchy vegetables. There is no limit on starchy vegetables
  • Offer at least a half cup of fruit in grades K-8 and at least 1 cup of fruit in grades 9-12
  • Offer at least a half cup (grades K-8) or 3/4 cup (grades 9-12) of “other vegetables,” which may be met with any of the above vegetables except for starchy vegetables
  • Allow tofu as a meat alternative
  • Get federal reimbursement only if they offer at least a half cup of a fruit or vegetable
  • Contain no fewer than 550 calories for grades K-5, 600 calories for grades 6-8, and 750 calories for grades 9-12
  • Contain no more than 650 calories for grades K-5, 700 calories for grades 6-8, and 850 calories for grades 9-12
  • Obtain less than 10% of total calories from saturated fat
  • Have zero trans fat
  • Limit salt according to grade level
  • Offer at least a cup of low-fat or skim milk

These minimum requirements for vegetables and fruits are far lower than the recommended portions. For example, while the minimum vegetable requirement adds up to 3/4 of a cup for grades K-8, the recommended amount is 3 3/4 cups.

“Kids will get six-and-a-half more cups of fruits and vegetables than they did before,” Vilsack said.

The cost of the new standards is expected to be $3.2 billion over the next five years.

There are new standards for school breakfasts, too, although schools will be given time to phase in the breakfast recommendations.

Although schools may phase in the new lunch recommendations over the coming year, Vilsack said that “several thousand schools” have already adopted the new school lunch plan.

Ray said school cooks would be getting new training, and get a chance to participate in healthy, tasty, and attractive recipe competitions. To start things off, Ray created a lunch menu served at the elementary school that served as a setting for today’s announcement. That menu was:

  • Tacos with turkey, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, salsa, Mexican brown rice, and whole-grain flat bread
  • Black bean and corn salad
  • Mixed fresh fruits
  • Low-fat or non-fat milk

The new school lunch rules aren’t the end of the program. In coming months, the USDA will set new rules for vending machines on school campuses.


USDA web site.

USDA news releases.

USDA news conference.

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