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Published inThe Huffington Post on 1/18/12

Authored By Deborah Kotz for U.S. News Health

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/18/longevity-health_n_1211700.html?ref=email_share#s619077&title=Related_Video

So, What are the 11 Habits Cited?

1. Dont Retire
2. Floss Every Day
3. Move Around
4. Eat a Fiber-Rich Cereal For Breakfast
5. Get at Least Six Hours Of Shut-Eye
6. Consume Whole Foods, Not Supplements
7. Be Less Neurotic
8. Live Like a Seventh Day Adventist *
9. Be A Creature of Habit

10.Stay Connected
11. Be Conscientious

One of the biggest factors that determines how well you age is not your genes but how well you live. Not convinced? A study published in 2009 in the British Medical Journal of 20,000 British folks shows that you can cut your risk of having a stroke in half by doing the following four things: being active for 30 minutes a day, eating five daily servings of fruit and vegetables, and avoiding cigarettes and excess alcohol.

While those are some of the obvious steps you can take to age well, researchers have discovered that centenarians tend to share certain traits in how they eat, move about, and deal with stress — the sorts of things we can emulate to improve our own aging process. Of course, getting to age 100 is enormously more likely if your parents did. (Recent research suggests that centenarians are 20 times as likely as the average person to have at least one long-lived relative.) Still, Thomas Perls, who studies the century-plus set at Boston University School of Medicine, believes that assuming you’ve sidestepped genes for truly fatal diseases like Huntington’s, “there’s nothing stopping you from living independently well into your 90s.” Heck, if your parents and grandparents were heavy smokers, they might have died prematurely without ever reaching their true potential lifespan, so go ahead and shoot for those triple digits. Follow these 11 habits and check out Perls’ lifetime risk calculator to see how long you can expect to live.

* Note This:

Americans who define themselves as Seventh Day Adventists have an average life expectancy of 89, about a decade longer than the average American. One of the basic tenets of the religion is that it’s important to cherish the body that’s on loan from God, which means no smoking, alcohol abuse, or overindulging in sweets. Followers typically stick to a vegetarian diet based on fruits, vegetables, beans and nuts, and get plenty of exercise. They’re also very focused on family and community.

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Filed under: Childhood ObesityDiabetesExerciseHeart DiseaseMotivationNutritionObesityParentingStrokes

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