web analytics

Parenting Archives

Listen with webreader

Posted on February 07, 2012 by The VRG Blog Editor

Gestational diabetes is a kind of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. It can cause problems during pregnancy and in the newborn infant. Risk factors for gestational diabetes include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and ethnicity. Hispanics, African Americans, Native Americans, Pacific Islanders, Asians, and Asian Indians are at higher risk for developing this condition.

A just-published study examined dietary factors that could increase a woman’s risk of developing gestational diabetes. Women who ate the highest amount of animal fat before they were pregnant had about a 90% greater risk of developing gestational diabetes compared with women eating the lowest amount of animal fat. There was no association between vegetable fat and gestational diabetes. Cholesterol was also associated with an increased risk. The study authors suggest that even as simple a change as replacing 5% of animal fat with vegetable fat could reduce risk of diabetes. While women cannot change risk factors like ethnicity or family history of diabetes, moving away from (or eliminating) animal fat could markedly change their risk of gestational diabetes. “Our findings indicate that women who reduce the proportion of animal fat and cholesterol in their diets before pregnancy may lower their risk for gestational diabetes during pregnancy,” said senior author Cuilin Zhang, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., of the Epidemiology Branch at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

To read more about this study see: http://www.nih.gov/news/health/jan2012/nichd-25.htm


Post to Twitter

New School Lunch Nutrition Standards

Listen with webreader

by Daniel J. DeNoon

January 25, 2012 — For the first time in 15 years, the National School Lunch Program has raised nutrition standards.

The new rules mean kids will see more fruits and vegetables every day. Portions will be smaller. Only low-fat or skim milk will be served. There will be a lot more whole grains. And schools will get more money — an extra six cents a meal — from the federal government.

But Congress in 2011 forbade the USDA from limiting servings of potatoes. The law also allows schools to count the tomato paste on pizza as a vegetable. But Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says that won’t throw a monkey wrench into the new standards.

“It was a bit unfortunate that some groups had powerful friends in Congress and basically tried to sort of short-change [kids] and create some confusion with these standards,” Vilsack said at a news conference. “Our response was to set up minimum requirements. You have to have a minimum level of dark green vegetables, you’ve got to have a minimum level of red or orange or yellow vegetables.”

Celebrity chef Rachael Ray, who joined Vilsack in announcing the new standards, says the potato/pizza loopholes won’t keep the new rules from making school lunches healthier.

“OK, so congress left pizza a vegetable. But we are changing the game today,” Ray said. “That [lunch] tray is going to have leafy greens and colorful fruit on it. If one of the other vegetables happens to be pizza or French fries in some schools that day, it doesn’t negate the fact that on the tray there is going to be a goal, depending on grade level, of roughly 800 calories — and it will include vegetables and fruits.”

Vilsack said that schools will be encouraged to serve baked or roasted potatoes instead of French fries.

About 32 million U.S. kids eat school lunches. Many of these kids get half their daily calories from these meals.

New School Lunch Rules

Today’s rules mean that school lunches must:

  • Offer a minimum of 8 to 10 ounces of whole grains. No more than two desserts a week may be used to meet this minimum
  • Offer at least a half cup per week of dark green vegetables
  • Offer at least 3/4 cup red/orange vegetables for grades K-8, and at least 1 1/4 cups in grades 9-12
  • Offer at least a half cup of beans or peas
  • Offer at least a half cup of starchy vegetables. There is no limit on starchy vegetables
  • Offer at least a half cup of fruit in grades K-8 and at least 1 cup of fruit in grades 9-12
  • Offer at least a half cup (grades K-8) or 3/4 cup (grades 9-12) of “other vegetables,” which may be met with any of the above vegetables except for starchy vegetables
  • Allow tofu as a meat alternative
  • Get federal reimbursement only if they offer at least a half cup of a fruit or vegetable
  • Contain no fewer than 550 calories for grades K-5, 600 calories for grades 6-8, and 750 calories for grades 9-12
  • Contain no more than 650 calories for grades K-5, 700 calories for grades 6-8, and 850 calories for grades 9-12
  • Obtain less than 10% of total calories from saturated fat
  • Have zero trans fat
  • Limit salt according to grade level
  • Offer at least a cup of low-fat or skim milk

These minimum requirements for vegetables and fruits are far lower than the recommended portions. For example, while the minimum vegetable requirement adds up to 3/4 of a cup for grades K-8, the recommended amount is 3 3/4 cups.

“Kids will get six-and-a-half more cups of fruits and vegetables than they did before,” Vilsack said.

The cost of the new standards is expected to be $3.2 billion over the next five years.

There are new standards for school breakfasts, too, although schools will be given time to phase in the breakfast recommendations.

Although schools may phase in the new lunch recommendations over the coming year, Vilsack said that “several thousand schools” have already adopted the new school lunch plan.

Ray said school cooks would be getting new training, and get a chance to participate in healthy, tasty, and attractive recipe competitions. To start things off, Ray created a lunch menu served at the elementary school that served as a setting for today’s announcement. That menu was:

  • Tacos with turkey, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, salsa, Mexican brown rice, and whole-grain flat bread
  • Black bean and corn salad
  • Mixed fresh fruits
  • Low-fat or non-fat milk

The new school lunch rules aren’t the end of the program. In coming months, the USDA will set new rules for vending machines on school campuses.

SOURCES:

USDA web site.

USDA news releases.

USDA news conference.


Post to Twitter

11 Health Habits That Will Help You Live To 100

Listen with webreader

Published inThe Huffington Post on 1/18/12

Authored By Deborah Kotz for U.S. News Health

CLICK HERE  TO READ THE WHOLE STORY:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/18/longevity-health_n_1211700.html?ref=email_share#s619077&title=Related_Video

So, What are the 11 Habits Cited?

1. Dont Retire
2. Floss Every Day
3. Move Around
4. Eat a Fiber-Rich Cereal For Breakfast
5. Get at Least Six Hours Of Shut-Eye
6. Consume Whole Foods, Not Supplements
7. Be Less Neurotic
8. Live Like a Seventh Day Adventist *
9. Be A Creature of Habit

10.Stay Connected
11. Be Conscientious

One of the biggest factors that determines how well you age is not your genes but how well you live. Not convinced? A study published in 2009 in the British Medical Journal of 20,000 British folks shows that you can cut your risk of having a stroke in half by doing the following four things: being active for 30 minutes a day, eating five daily servings of fruit and vegetables, and avoiding cigarettes and excess alcohol.

While those are some of the obvious steps you can take to age well, researchers have discovered that centenarians tend to share certain traits in how they eat, move about, and deal with stress — the sorts of things we can emulate to improve our own aging process. Of course, getting to age 100 is enormously more likely if your parents did. (Recent research suggests that centenarians are 20 times as likely as the average person to have at least one long-lived relative.) Still, Thomas Perls, who studies the century-plus set at Boston University School of Medicine, believes that assuming you’ve sidestepped genes for truly fatal diseases like Huntington’s, “there’s nothing stopping you from living independently well into your 90s.” Heck, if your parents and grandparents were heavy smokers, they might have died prematurely without ever reaching their true potential lifespan, so go ahead and shoot for those triple digits. Follow these 11 habits and check out Perls’ lifetime risk calculator to see how long you can expect to live.

* Note This:

Americans who define themselves as Seventh Day Adventists have an average life expectancy of 89, about a decade longer than the average American. One of the basic tenets of the religion is that it’s important to cherish the body that’s on loan from God, which means no smoking, alcohol abuse, or overindulging in sweets. Followers typically stick to a vegetarian diet based on fruits, vegetables, beans and nuts, and get plenty of exercise. They’re also very focused on family and community.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE WHOLE STORY


Post to Twitter

Listen with webreader

 

One of every two of you have a deadly disease that’s making you sick and will kill you, and 90 percent of you don’t even know you have it.

What’s worse is your doctor is not trained how to find it, and they are not even looking for it.

This problem will cost us $3.5 trillion over the next 10 years. It is bankrupting our economy. In 30 years 100 percent of our federal budget will be needed to pay for Medicare and Medicaid, leaving nothing for education, defense, agriculture, roads or even social security.

So what am I talking about? I’m talking about diabesity — the number one cause of obesity, heart disease, cancer, dementia and of course type 2 diabetes.

You might hear many terms used to describe this one basic phenomenon — a new epidemic of disordered biology and disease. It is the continuum of abnormal biology that ranges from mild insulin resistance to full-blown diabetes. We call it by many names. See if you recognize any of them: Read the rest of this entry


Post to Twitter

Watching TV can make you Fat

Listen with webreader

Watching TV can definitely make anyone fat.  No, not just because it is a sedentary activity, but because the information most commercials are giving is extremely misleading and really confusing, to say the least.

Most people who know me, know I am not a TV watcher. Actually, I don’t even have cable at home (A rare thing these days, I know.) Very often, I have no idea which show is the “latest craze” and which commercials are all the rave.

Last week the TV did catch my attention. I was at my parent’s house and my mom had the TV on in the background. I was helping her cook and I nearly chopped my fingers off because I couldn’t believe what I was hearing!

“Eat Cheerios to lower your cholesterol.” “Three or more glasses of skim milk a day are a great way to lose weight”. Then it got ugly “Splenda is just like sugar and is great for kids”.

The worst of them all (the one where my mother had to nearly restrain me from attacking the TV “There is nothing wrong with High Fructose Corn Syrup. It comes from corn and can actually be good for you.” I nearly passed out.

I can see why people are totally confused about healthy eating. I can also see why obesity, heart disease and Type 2 diabetes are at an all time high in this country and in many others as well.

After I was done hyperventilating, I decided to first turn the TV off (because my heart just couldn’t take anymore) and then write this newsletter to clear up a few misconceptions.

1. Cheerios biggest claim to fame is that eating them will help you lower your cholesterol. I am here to tell you that eating processed grains, especially in the form of cereal can actually make your cholesterol go up! The cholesterol study done showed how soluble fiber can help the body eliminate bad cholesterol from the body. Cheerios has 1 gram of soluble fiber per serving. Woop-dee-doo. Big deal. I can get 2 grams of soluble fiber from an apple, 3 grams from broccoli and carrots, and more than 4 grams from kidney beans. (Beat that Cheerio Man). Honestly, I don’t think there are many foods in a box that are healthy at all. They have to be highly processed to stay shelf stable, many times loading them up with chemicals and fillers that are making us gain weight. My recommendation is ditch the cereal and pick up some wholesome natural foods like fruits and veggies. Natural grains like brown rice, millet and quinoa are 10x’s better than any boxed cereal.

2. Milk does a body bad! That’s really what the commercial should say. Ok, that is not entirely true. Conventional milk does a body bad. If you have read the Dairy chapter in The Diet Solution Program, you know my stance on milk: Organic is a must and Raw Milk is even better. If you didn’t read my article on milk, you can read it here:

 

http://www.thedietsolutionprogram.com/articles.aspx?article=Is-Milk-really-Healthy?

But don’t go yet until you read #3.

3. Give Splenda to my children? Never! Splenda has not been out on the market long enough to show whether it is actually safe or not. Until then it is a public health experiment (No thanks, I don’t’ want to be your guinea pig). Being the organic chemistry nerd that I am, I know exactly how sugar is converted to Splenda. I will spare you the chem lesson but tell you that Splenda (or sucralose) is a synthetic compound stumbled upon in 1976 by scientists in Britain seeking a new pesticide formulation. Huh? Did you say pesticide? Yup. Many chemists believe this molecule resembles a pesticide much more than it resembles natural sugar. If this is still in debate, I will not be a test subject. I highly recommend you take yourself and your children out of this experiment as well. My tip: Stick to natural sweeteners like whole fruits, stevia and agave syrup and stay away from artificial sweeteners like Splenda, Equal and Sweet & Low.

I could probably go on and on. If I watched TV long enough (or if I actually purchased cable) I could probably find 10, 20, 100 more commercials that are giving us false info, all in the name of selling products.

Now, go shut the TV off will ya?

Read the Real Truth about Healthy Eating and Weight Loss and get started on your own fat loss and health goals right away.

For more Information about Weight Loss View the VIDEO:
NutriSystem, Inc.


Post to Twitter

Diet Soda Weight Gain

Listen with webreader

At a June 2011 meeting of the American Diabetes Association, two studies were presented that reported diet soda weight gain association and elevated blood sugar.

In the first report, 474 subjects were followed for nearly 10 years. Participants who said they drank two or more diet sodas a day experienced increases in waist circumference that were 600 percent greater than those who did not drink diet soda.

The researchers also reported that, as a group, those who ingested diet soda had a 70 percent greater increase in waist circumference as compared to those who did not drink diet soda.

A second study reported that mice that were fed aspartame (i.e., NutraSweet) had blood sugar levels that were higher than mice not fed aspartame.

Artificial sweeteners, which diet soda contains, can lead to a whole host of health problems, including diabetes, weight gain, and neurological disorders. It is extremely difficult for a patient to lose weight if he or she is ingesting artificial sweeteners.

Numerous research studies link these substances with health risks such as diabetes. If the Food and Drug Administration was doing its job properly, these sweeteners would never have been approved for consumption.

© 2011 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Special Links

Sugar and Other Foods Shorten Your Lifespan

11 Easy Ways to Fight Diabetes

Diabetes is Epidemic. Beat It Before It Beats You.

Discover the World’s Greatest Dividend Stock

Read more: Diet Soda Makes You Fat
Important: At Risk For A Heart Attack? Find Out Now.

var flag_0 = true; var i = 0; function playerState0(state){ if(state.data == 1){ if(flag_0 == true){ setTimeout(function(){get_fb_0();}, 10*1000); }else{ setTimeout(function() { $jq(‘#banner_0’).slideUp(500); }, 10*1000); } } } $jq(document).ready(function() { $jq(‘.close_banner’).live(‘click’,function(){ $jq(‘#banner_0’).hide(); }); });

“>Please CLICK HERE to see a related video:

Read the rest of this entry


Post to Twitter

5 Cheap Ways To Stay Healthy!

Listen with webreader

by Helene Mansion (Adelaide, Australia)

Since many people are very conscious about the look of their body, many are looking for ways to keep fit and slim. For those who are lucky enough like Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie where they have sufficient funds to go to the gym and other facilities or to have their bodies done thru medical procedures, it is certainly very easy to get a nice looking body.

But for the regular John Doe, it can be very difficult to spend the money required for membership in a gym or to buy slimming medicines.

If you are one of those regular citizens who don’t have enough money to even consult a personal trainer, then don’t be too sad or depressed since there are simple ways to be healthy and slim.

Yes, you don’t even have to go to the gym. All you have to do is act as normal as possible to be healthy. Take a peek as the list below – you will see there are lots of ways to be healthy that do not cost anything at all. Read the rest of this entry


Post to Twitter

Listen with webreader

News Author: Laurie Barclay, MD
CME Author: Laurie Barclay, MD

Severe acne is associated with the risk for suicide attempt even before treatment with isotretinoin was started, although the risk is increased during treatment and up to 6 months afterward, according to the results of a retrospective Swedish cohort study reported online first November 12 in the BMJ. Read the rest of this entry


Post to Twitter

‘ARE KIDS WATCHING TOO MUCH T.V. ?

Listen with webreader
  • There’s an inverse link between the amount of time kids spend watching TV and the amount of time they exercise,” says William H. Dietz, M.D., Ph.D., director of the division of nutrition and physical activity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Lack of exercise and poor diet can lead to diabetes and other chronic ailments.
  • Kids need aerobic activity that involves steady movement, says Howard Taras, M.D., professor of school health and community pediatrics at the University of California in San Diego. “Just because a child is busy doesn’t mean he or she is getting enough aerobic exercise,” says Dr. Taras. He suggests that you:
  • Keep kids away from TV or computer games until they’ve exercised.
  • Set times for homework and reading, hanging out and physical activity.
  • Find well-run community fitness programs for your children.\n


  • Post to Twitter

    OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE CHILDREN

    Listen with webreader
    • Rates of obesity are climbing among Children.
    • The percentage of children who are overweight has doubled in the last 20 years.
    • Childhood obesity is on the rise. Nearly 20 percent of U.S. children are obese. Three decades ago, that number was only about 7 percent.
    • Baby fat is something children are supposed to outgrow, not grow into.
    • At one time, an overweight child was more the exception than the rule. But these days, the number of obese children in the United States is increasing at an alarming rate.
    • The analysis of more than 15,000 young people in the United States found about a third of the cases of depression and obesity among those teens could be attributed to being from families with low incomes.
    • The struggle to develop good eating habits among toddlers, preschoolers and older children seems never-ending. But encouraging children to eat right doesn\’t require battle, just some common sense.
    • Do you know how much exercise your kids get? If you take their word for it, you may not have the full story.
    • Children overestimate their activity levels, according to the Harvard School of Public Health. In one study, 45 students ages 11 to 13 wore monitors for two four-day trials. Then researchers checked that data against kids\’ verbal reports. The result? Students said they did more moderate and vigorous activity than they really did.
    • “Many parents overestimate the amount of exercise their kids are getting,” says Janet Silverstein, M.D., a pediatrician who focuses on endocrinology (which includes the study of growth and metabolism). “It’s important for parents to be aware of how much exercise their kids are getting so they can make adjustments.”

    CLICK HERE FOR YOUR KID\’S FITNESS PROGRAM:

    …..AND/OR JOIN THE CLUB!



    Post to Twitter

     Page 1 of 2  1  2 »