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Since our previous post on this subject of insulin and Alzheimer’s Disease, on 12/24/2012, additional valuable information has become available. Click the Link below for an update.

To learn more about Alzheimer’s or see additional videos, visit http://itsh.bo/fJrKLc.

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Click the Arrow Button if you want to know about being “FED UP”

Get Your FREE Guide to Resources for Diabetes HERE!

Combine the new Fresh Foam 1080 with the adaptive fit technology and comfort of Trinamic Compression Apparel. Shop these collections with superior comfort and performance today exclusively from New Balance!


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11 Health Habits That Will Help You Live To 100

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Published inThe Huffington Post on 1/18/12

Authored By Deborah Kotz for U.S. News Health

CLICK HERE  TO READ THE WHOLE STORY:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/18/longevity-health_n_1211700.html?ref=email_share#s619077&title=Related_Video

So, What are the 11 Habits Cited?

1. Dont Retire
2. Floss Every Day
3. Move Around
4. Eat a Fiber-Rich Cereal For Breakfast
5. Get at Least Six Hours Of Shut-Eye
6. Consume Whole Foods, Not Supplements
7. Be Less Neurotic
8. Live Like a Seventh Day Adventist *
9. Be A Creature of Habit

10.Stay Connected
11. Be Conscientious

One of the biggest factors that determines how well you age is not your genes but how well you live. Not convinced? A study published in 2009 in the British Medical Journal of 20,000 British folks shows that you can cut your risk of having a stroke in half by doing the following four things: being active for 30 minutes a day, eating five daily servings of fruit and vegetables, and avoiding cigarettes and excess alcohol.

While those are some of the obvious steps you can take to age well, researchers have discovered that centenarians tend to share certain traits in how they eat, move about, and deal with stress — the sorts of things we can emulate to improve our own aging process. Of course, getting to age 100 is enormously more likely if your parents did. (Recent research suggests that centenarians are 20 times as likely as the average person to have at least one long-lived relative.) Still, Thomas Perls, who studies the century-plus set at Boston University School of Medicine, believes that assuming you’ve sidestepped genes for truly fatal diseases like Huntington’s, “there’s nothing stopping you from living independently well into your 90s.” Heck, if your parents and grandparents were heavy smokers, they might have died prematurely without ever reaching their true potential lifespan, so go ahead and shoot for those triple digits. Follow these 11 habits and check out Perls’ lifetime risk calculator to see how long you can expect to live.

* Note This:

Americans who define themselves as Seventh Day Adventists have an average life expectancy of 89, about a decade longer than the average American. One of the basic tenets of the religion is that it’s important to cherish the body that’s on loan from God, which means no smoking, alcohol abuse, or overindulging in sweets. Followers typically stick to a vegetarian diet based on fruits, vegetables, beans and nuts, and get plenty of exercise. They’re also very focused on family and community.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE WHOLE STORY


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One of every two of you have a deadly disease that’s making you sick and will kill you, and 90 percent of you don’t even know you have it.

What’s worse is your doctor is not trained how to find it, and they are not even looking for it.

This problem will cost us $3.5 trillion over the next 10 years. It is bankrupting our economy. In 30 years 100 percent of our federal budget will be needed to pay for Medicare and Medicaid, leaving nothing for education, defense, agriculture, roads or even social security.

So what am I talking about? I’m talking about diabesity — the number one cause of obesity, heart disease, cancer, dementia and of course type 2 diabetes.

You might hear many terms used to describe this one basic phenomenon — a new epidemic of disordered biology and disease. It is the continuum of abnormal biology that ranges from mild insulin resistance to full-blown diabetes. We call it by many names. See if you recognize any of them: Read the rest of this entry


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Bill Clinton Touts Vegan Diet

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Bill Clinton’s diet has changed so much since his McDonald’s days that when CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta asked him in a recent interview whether he considers himself a vegan, the former president replied: “Well, I suppose I am.”

In the interview, a portion of which was released on Thursday, Clinton said he has cut dairy and meat, even fish, out of his diet.

Editor’s Notes:

In 2006 They Laughed at His Predictions. Now They Say His Work Is “The Bible.”

Doctor: Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s Can Be Prevented

“At Thanksgiving, I had one bite of turkey,” he said.

According to CNN, Clinton has dropped 20 pounds and says he’s healthier than ever. But the change only came about at the urging of a trusted doctor, and even then after two heart procedures. In 2004, Clinton underwent quadruple bypass surgery after experiencing tightness in his chest. Even after cutting down on calories and cholesterol, Clinton had to have another procedure last year. Doctors put two stents in one of the veins from the bypass surgery.

After the second procedure, Dr. Dean Ornish, who had once worked with White House chefs during Clinton’s administration to get healthier foods in the president’s diet, met with Clinton and gave him some advice.

“I shared with him that because of his genetics, moderate changes in diet and lifestyle weren’t enough to keep his disease from progressing,” Ornish told CNN. “However, our research showed that more intensive changes actually reverse progression of heart disease in most people.”

Ornish offered to work with Clinton, and Clinton decided he needed to really change the way he eats.

“I essentially concluded that I had played Russian roulette,” Clinton told CNN, “because even though I had changed my diet some and cut down on the caloric total of my ingestion and cut back on much of the cholesterol in the food I was eating, I still — without any scientific basis to support what I did — was taking in a lot of extra cholesterol without knowing if my body would produce enough of the enzyme to support it, and clearly it didn’t or I wouldn’t have had that blockage. So that’s when I made a decision to really change.”

Working with Ornish and another doctor named Caldwell Esselstyn Jr., Clinton has cut meat, dairy, eggs, and almost all oils from his diet. He hopes to get his weight down to 185 pounds.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease caused 26 percent of deaths in America in 2006, making it the leading cause of death for both men and women. Every year, about 785,000 Americans have a first heart attack.

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