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TIP No.3 “MAKE A GAME OF IT, WITH ADDED INCREMENTS

(, “Staying At IT” ..continued. Be sure you read previous posts on this subject)

In an effort to set yourself up for success, not failure, establish long term (two months or more), medium term (one month), and short term (weekly) goals.

Let’s say you went to the gym and fell in love with the elliptical trainer. This machine is low impact, it’s aerobic, and it will even add some muscle strength to your body – overall, not a bad machine. You’ve worked on it two, three or four times and you want to continue but even now you realize it’s starting to get boring, especially in the long term. You clearly see the benefits but can’t envision doing this exercise day in and day out for weeks, yet alone months. So here’s what you need to do – make a game of it. If you’re currently on the machine for 25 minutes a day set your short term goal to 30 minutes, or 29 minutes, or 28 minutes (- it really doesn’t matter) but set a  “realistic” a short term goal with progressive added increments in time and intensity. Read the rest of this entry


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EXERCISE – “STAYING AT IT” – CHAPTER 2

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TIP No.2 SET GOALS

(, “Stay At IT” ..continued. Be sure you read previous posts on this subject)

The key to a long term exercise program is setting realistic goals. Do not say, “I want to lose 16 pounds in a month”, but instead, “I want to lose 4 pounds by month’s end.”

The former may be doable, but you will be so miserable in the process of losing those 16 pounds that you will quit before the end of the month or shortly thereafter – thereby, putting yourself in jeopardy of not only gaining it all back but putting on additional pounds to boot.

Keep in mind, exercising to stay healthy is not short term, and it is not a goal in life – it is a life style that once having achieved your primary objective, will require you to maintain those hard fought gains for the rest of your life.

Even the most fit person will lose his peak in as little as four or five days, and may even return to pre-exercise condition in as little as 10 to 12 weeks. So you will always need to keep at it. It’s never ending.

 
Step It Up! Surgeon General's Call to Action to Promote Walking and Walkable Communities


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EXERCISE – “STAYING AT IT” – CHAPTER 1

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The majority of us need some kind of incentive to every day. True, there are the few who get out of bed in the morning and do their thing. Day -After-Day. It’s part of their nature – they feel good about what they’re doing and that’s reason enough for them to stretch, do aerobics, yoga, pilates – it doesn’t matter – they do it to feel good.

But for most of us, exercising is a chore, an abysmal task, a drudgery that we all know “in theory” should be done every day, or at least most days. But it usually soon gets set aside with such inglorious excuses as; “I woke up too late”, “The kids were sick”, “I didn’t get enough sleep.” Or maybe the most honest answer of all, “I just didn’t feel like exercising today.” So what do the rest of us do to make sure we “Stay at It”?

The majority of us need some kind of incentive to exercise every day. True, there are the few who get out of bed in the morning and do their thing. Day -After-Day. It’s part of their nature – they feel good about what they’re doing and that’s reason enough for them to stretch, do aerobics, yoga, pilates – it doesn’t matter – they do it to feel good.

But for most of us, exercising is a chore, an abysmal task, a drudgery that we all know “in theory” should be done every day, or at least most days. But it usually soon gets set aside with such inglorious excuses as; “I woke up too late”, “The kids were sick”, “I didn’t get enough sleep.” Or maybe the most honest answer of all, “I just didn’t feel like exercising today.” So whatdo the rest of us do to make sure we

“Stay at It”?TIP NO 1. CONSISTENCY

First of all, realize that if you want to exercise everyday it must become a habit, second nature, something you don’t even need to think about. But habits take time to develop. On average a good habit, as opposed to a bad habit which often develops very quickly, takes somewhere between 21 – 30 days to develop.

And that’s if you do it consistently every day. Not once a week, not every other day, and certainly not sometimes – every day for three to four weeks. But even when you get in the habit of exercising, you will still need an incentive to want to continue.  Habits, especially good ones, can become old and tired over time. Or what if you are sick for a day or two, what happens to the habit then? What will make you want to get back up on the horse (figuratively speaking of course), and  ride again?

Step It Up! Surgeon General's Call to Action to Promote Walking and Walkable Communities


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CAN LIFESTYLE CHANGE PREVENT OR CURE TYPE 2 DIABETES?

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  • Dealing with the onslaught of diabetes in the American population is one the nation’s most pressing health challenges. The growing prevalence of T2DM will stress the medical care system, increase spending and utilization intensity, and may well lead to an increase in heart disease rates.
  • Lifestyle change must play a central role in T2DM prevention and treatment strategies\r\nSuccessfully managing the diabetes crisis requires acknowledging that it is primarily (in the case of Type 2 DM), a disorder of lifestyle. Insulin resistance in aging adults stems in large part from physical inactivity and injudicious eating habits that lead to weight gain and disordered glucose metabolism.\r\n It is possible to normalize HBA1C levels in adults using evidence-based physical activity strategies and eating habits. Stabilizing this critical measure of long-term glucose control is an essential step in eventually helping people reduce the intensity of their medical care utilization, and, thus, lower the amount of money spent on their medical care needs.
  • An essential, but often overlooked, element in ameliorating the impact of T2DM on the US’s medical care system is engaging at-risk adults in the process of lifestyle change.
  • Without meaningful, evidence-based lifestyle change, there is virtually no hope of stemming the tidal wave of spending and adverse quality of life impacts that will come over the next two decades as a result of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.


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(Exercise, “Staying At IT” ..continued. Be sure you read previous posts on this subject)

The key to a long term exercise program is setting realistic goals.

Do not say, “I want to lose 16 pounds in a month”,

but instead, “I want to lose 4 pounds by month’s end.”

The former may be doable, but you will be so miserable in the process of losing those 16 pounds that you will quit before the end of the month or shortly thereafter – thereby, putting yourself in jeopardy of not only gaining it all back but putting on additional pounds to boot.

Keep in mind, exercising to stay healthy is not short term, and it is not a goal in life – it is a LIFE STYLE that once having achieved your primary objective, will require you to maintain those hard fought gains for the rest of your life.

Even the most fit person will lose his peak in as little as four or five days, and may even return to pre-exercise condition in as little as 10 to 12 weeks. So you will always need to keep at it. It’s never ending.

Put this advice into practice and come back to this site for more tips later. GOOD LUCK!

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Listen with webreader

The majority of us need some kind of incentive to exercise every day.

True, there are the few who get out of bed in the morning and do their thing. Day -After-Day.

It’s part of their nature – they feel good about what they’re doing and that’s reason enough for them to stretch, do aerobics, yoga, pilates – it doesn’t matter – they do it to feel good.

But for most of us, exercising is a chore, an abysmal task, a drudgery that we all know “in theory” should be done every day, or at least most days. But it usually soon gets set aside with such inglorious excuses as; “I woke up too late”, “The kids were sick”, “I didn’t get enough sleep.” Or maybe the most honest answer of all, “I just didn’t feel like exercising today.” So what do the rest of us do to make sure we “Stay at It”?

TIP NO 1. CONSISTENCY

First of all, realize that if you want to exercise everyday it must become a habit, second nature, something you don’t even need to think about. But habits take time to develop. On average a good habit, as opposed to a bad habit which often develops very quickly, takes somewhere between 21 – 30 days to develop.

And that’s if you do it consistently every day. Not once a week, not every other day, and certainly not sometimes – every day for three to four weeks. But even when you get in the habit of exercising, you will still need an incentive to want to continue.  Habits, especially good ones, can become old and tired over time. Or what if you are sick for a day or two, what happens to the habit then? What will make you want to get back up on the horse (figuratively speaking of course), and  ride again? Read the rest of this entry


Post to Twitter

Listen with webreader
  • Dealing with the onslaught of diabetes in the American population is one the nation’s most pressing health challenges.

  • The growing prevalence of T2DM will stress the medical care system, increase spending and utilization intensity, and may well lead to an increase in heart disease rates.

  • Lifestyle change must play a central role in T2DM prevention and treatment strategies.

  • Successfully managing the diabetes crisis requires acknowledging that it is primarily (in the case of Type 2 DM), a disorder of lifestyle.

  • Insulin resistance in aging adults stems in large part from physical inactivity and injudicious eating habits that lead to weight gain and disordered glucose metabolism.

  • It is possible to normalize HBA1C levels in adults using evidence-based physical activity strategies and eating habits. Stabilizing this critical measure of long-term glucose control is an essential step in eventually helping people reduce the intensity of their medical care utilization, and, thus, lower the amount of money spent on their medical care needs.

  • An essential, but often overlooked, element in ameliorating the impact of T2DM on the US’s medical care system is engaging at-risk adults in the process of lifestyle change.

  • Without meaningful, evidence-based lifestyle change, there is virtually no hope of stemming the tidal wave of spending and adverse quality of life impacts that will come over the next two decades as a result of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.



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THE CASE FOR LIFESTYLE INTERVENTION

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  • The greatest improvements in public health in the U.S. will be made by helping individuals adopt and maintain healthier lifestyles. This would include avoidance of tobacco, a healthier, simpler diet, and more consistent physical activity.

  • Chronic diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes, are responsible for most deaths in the United States.

  • Approximately 70-90% of  deaths in the USA are estimated to be caused by poor nutrition, sedentary living, and tobacco use and are largely preventable.

  • 23% of adults smoke, 77% fail to consume a healthy diet, and 78% are at elevated health risk because they fail to get enough physical activity.

  • According to the Surgeon General, 70 percent of our health status is determined by the lifestyle choices we make—what we eat and drink, whether we smoke and exercise, and how we love.



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